UDINE, city, capital of Udine provincia, Friuli-Venezia Giulia regione, northeastern Italy. It lies northwest of Trieste, near the border with Slovenia. Possibly the site of a Roman frontier station called Utina, the city was the seat of the Roman Catholic patriarchate of Aquileia from 1238 until 1751, when the patriarchate was dissolved and replaced by the archbishoprics of Udine and Gorizia. Conquered by the Venetians in 1420 and ceded to Austria by the Treaty of Campo Formio in 1797, Udine was united with Italy in 1866. It was the headquarters of the Italian army in 1915-17 during World War I and suffered heavy bomb damage in World War II. The city is dominated by a castle (rebuilt 1517) that was originally the seat of the patriarchs and of the Venetian governors and now houses a museum and art gallery with works by Giovanni Battista Tiepolo and other artists of the Venetian school. Other notable buildings are the Palazzo del Comune (1448-56); the elegant Loggia del San Giovanni (1533-39), by Bernardino da Morcote, with a notable clock tower (see photograph) by Giovanni da Udine, a native of the city; and the 16th-century archiepiscopal palace. Udine was relatively undamaged in the severe earthquake that shook Friuli-Venezia Giulia in May 1976. It is a thriving trade and industrial centre with ironworks, cotton mills, tanneries, and machine and food industries. Pop. (1990 est.) mun., 98,872.

Portico of San Giovanni and clock tower, Udine